Knowledge And Wisdom Part 1

In the Catholic intellectual tradition, philosophy has traditionally been referred to as the “handmaid” of theology. The reason for this is that philosophical truths rooted in our human nature and the natural world give credence to something that is more than merely human or natural; that is, the divine. Hence, philosophy is something which those who believe in God can profit from studying. Traditional philosophical reasoning always leads to the divine; more practically, its truths can be used to engage with nearly any other person regardless of their beliefs. This is why I believe it is important for us to … Continue reading “Knowledge And Wisdom Part 1”

What Can a Wayfarer Know?

Mankind resembles Pieter Brueghel the Elder’s painting of the blind leading the blind. As the great Pascal tells us (great not because of his often misunderstood Wager but for the extent of his vision): Truth is so obscure in these times, and falsehood so established, that, unless we love the truth, we cannot know it. Without having a clear picture of the relationship of theology to philosophy, and, more broadly, that of the order of grace to the order of nature, mankind is led between the twin evils of rationalism and fideism. On one side we have the order of … Continue reading “What Can a Wayfarer Know?”

Divine Revelation in the Epistemology of Maimonides

In a previous article, I wrote about the centrality of the divine to Socrates’ epistemology. Here, I will discuss the source of prophecy in Maimonides’ epistemology. Over a millennium after Socrates, Maimonides echoes similar sentiments in his discourse on prophets in Book Two of The Guide for the Perplexed. He writes with the Aristotelian methodology prevalent in Egypt at his time to conclude that a man can be perfectly well-read and even have great character yet still not attain the status of prophet. Maimonides points out that knowledge and other forms of human wisdom, while necessary, are not sufficient to … Continue reading “Divine Revelation in the Epistemology of Maimonides”

Rediscovering Lost Horizons

Rediscovering the relationship between faith and reason is necessary for understanding and engaging with the atmosphere of our times. Indeed, it has been the church’s constant tradition to show those outside its fold how they possess vague glimpses of what the church teaches, believes, and confesses. However, before analyzing the relationship between faith and reason, we must know what faith and reason are. For through understanding the two terms we can better understand the nuances and particularities of their relationship. The moderns have often overlooked the dual nature of reason: intellectus and ratio. D. C. Schindler points out that the … Continue reading “Rediscovering Lost Horizons”