Ut Unum Sint

“The Council, for its part, considered the Churches of the East with objectivity and deep affection, stressing their ecclesial nature and the real bonds of communion linking them with the Catholic Church. The Decree on Ecumenism points out: ‘Through the celebration of the Eucharist of the Lord in each of these Churches, the Church of God is built up and grows in stature’. It adds, as a consequence, that ‘although these Churches are separated from us, they possess true sacraments, above all—by apostolic succession—the priesthood and the Eucharist, whereby they are still joined to us in a very close relationship.’” … Continue reading “Ut Unum Sint”

Cross-Generational Relationships

So Elijah went from there and found Elisha son of Shaphat. He was plowing with twelve yoke of oxen, and he himself was driving the twelfth pair. Elijah went up to him and threw his cloak around him. Elisha then left his oxen and ran after Elijah. “Let me kiss my father and mother goodbye,” he said, “and then I will come with you.” “Go back,” Elijah replied. “What have I done to you?” So Elisha left him and went back. He took his yoke of oxen and slaughtered them. He burned the plowing equipment to cook the meat and … Continue reading “Cross-Generational Relationships”

Wrestling with 2 Samuel Chapter 21

Several months ago I was speaking with someone (whom I can’t seem to remember!) about difficult passages in scripture. One passage that stuck out as something to spend more time wrestling with was the story in 2 Samuel 21 where David hands over the sons of Saul whom the Gibeonites kill. In this article I do not intend to write a definitive answer to those who wrestle with this passage; rather I wanted to present some thoughts I have had through both reading and conversation with the passage. Now there was a famine in the days of David for three … Continue reading “Wrestling with 2 Samuel Chapter 21”

Anti-Gossip

Gossip is one of those sins that is remarkably evasive and, in my experience, seldom taken seriously. Gossip is difficult to describe and easy to categorize away, making it easier and easier for Christians to fall into the habit of gossip. For instance, most would agree that you are not gossiping when you discuss the weakest points of a candidate with other interviewers in a hiring process. In fact, addressing the weak points can help determine if the role is good for the candidate and open up areas for further improvement. On the other side, it is fairly obvious one … Continue reading “Anti-Gossip”

Mortification and St. Ignatius of Loyola

In writing this article, I want to clarify any misconceptions that I may generate upfront. I am not arguing against mortification itself. I am not arguing against the practice of what I will call “continuous mortification” for some if not most Christians. What I am thinking through is the notion that continuous mortification is not necessary for all Christians at all times. In some definitions, mortification is a method used by Christians to contract the corruption of our past life of sin and raise us to a new life in Christ. Specifically, this method uses physical or mental approaches of … Continue reading “Mortification and St. Ignatius of Loyola”

Usury in the Modern World

This is the final part of a three-part series in which I speak about ethical investing from a Catholic perspective (though there is a debate!) This series was prompted by an interview of Jacob Imam with Pints With Aquinas. In my first article, I addressed the question of ethical investing and how the USCCB has recommended Christians navigate the modern economy. In the second installation, I discussed the responsibility to invest. In this last piece, I break down usury and why (most) modern investing would not fall into this category. When discussion of investing arises in Catholic (and other circles), … Continue reading “Usury in the Modern World”

Obligation to Invest

This is the second part of a three-part series in which I wish to speak about ethical investing from a Catholic perspective (though there is a debate!) This series was prompted by an interview of Jacob Imam by Pints With Aquinas. In my first article, I  addressed the question of ethical investing and how the USCCB has recommended Christians navigate the modern economy. In this piece, I will discuss the responsibility to invest. In my third piece, I will break down usury and why (most) modern investing would not fall into this category. “The Conference should exercise responsible financial stewardship … Continue reading “Obligation to Invest”

A Response to Jacob Imam

This article series will be a three-part series in which I wish to speak about ethical investing from a Catholic perspective (though there is a debate!) This series was prompted by an interview that Jacob Imam had with Pints with Aquinas. In this article, I will address the question of ethical investing and how the USCCB has recommended Christians navigate the modern economy. In my next piece, I will discuss the responsibility to invest. In my third piece I will break down usury and why (most) modern investing would not fall into this category. I want to first acknowledge what … Continue reading “A Response to Jacob Imam”

Life Isn’t Fair, and That Is a Good Thing!

Throughout history, when injustice strikes, the oft-made complaint by many people, in our nation as well as any other, is the powerful outcry, “this isn’t fair.” So strong is this invocation for justice that political movements grow and flourish when injustice occurs. Yet, whether politically or personally, these crusades for justice often find themselves causing injustice that spawns a crusade against the initial victim!  At this point, I should make clear that justice in the above sense is not actually justice but the desire that everything be split evenly. In a world void of love and evil, splitting things “fairly” … Continue reading “Life Isn’t Fair, and That Is a Good Thing!”

The Priesthood of the Church

As a Catholic, in conversations with fellow Christians, the question of the priesthood often arises. What is the purpose of a priest? Certainly, one can point to the importance of having a Church for doctrinal unity, but that points more to the importance of a Church rather than priests. Christ’s Apostles were fishermen, people from various walks of life, distinctly not part of the priestly contingent in Israel’s society. Why then does the Church have a priesthood, and what function does it serve? The quick answer to this question is the sacraments, the greatest of which is the Eucharist. The … Continue reading “The Priesthood of the Church”