The Rains

Sous la pluie: La mère et les enfants by Théophile Alexandre Steinlen

I want to share what happened to me a few weeks ago. Here in northern California, we’ve had an extremely wet winter; storms have been “on” more than they’ve been “off.” In an evening of respite, while expectant clouds painted the night sky, I visited the old town grocery store to fetch my daily bread. As I passed by, I noticed what appeared to be a homeless man shuffling through shopping carts by the entrance. If he was homeless, I mused, he might appreciate a meal. It was too late for the store to serve anything warm, so I fetched … Continue reading “The Rains”

Cross-Generational relationships

So Elijah went from there and found Elisha son of Shaphat. He was plowing with twelve yoke of oxen, and he himself was driving the twelfth pair. Elijah went up to him and threw his cloak around him. Elisha then left his oxen and ran after Elijah. “Let me kiss my father and mother goodbye,” he said, “and then I will come with you.” “Go back,” Elijah replied. “What have I done to you?” So Elisha left him and went back. He took his yoke of oxen and slaughtered them. He burned the plowing equipment to cook the meat and … Continue reading “Cross-Generational relationships”

Obligation to Invest

This is the second part of a three-part series in which I wish to speak about ethical investing from a Catholic perspective (though there is a debate!) This series was prompted by an interview of Jacob Imam by Pints With Aquinas. In my first article, I  addressed the question of ethical investing and how the USCCB has recommended Christians navigate the modern economy. In this piece, I will discuss the responsibility to invest. In my third piece, I will break down usury and why (most) modern investing would not fall into this category. “The Conference should exercise responsible financial stewardship … Continue reading “Obligation to Invest”

On Haman and Pettiness

Our Bible study finished Esther this month, and we decided to celebrate it by watching the 2006 film One Night with the King. It was partly well acted and very well-funded but laughably inaccurate and overall rather bad. You know your film is a poor retelling of the biblical story when it’s based on a fiction book that’s based on the book of Esther, rather than just being based on the book of Esther. Don’t worry; I watched Big Idea’s Esther: The Girl Who Became Queen myself afterward and so did not go to bed angry. While I could fill … Continue reading “On Haman and Pettiness”

A Response to Jacob Imam

This article series will be a three-part series in which I wish to speak about ethical investing from a Catholic perspective (though there is a debate!) This series was prompted by an interview that Jacob Imam had with Pints with Aquinas. In this article, I will address the question of ethical investing and how the USCCB has recommended Christians navigate the modern economy. In my next piece, I will discuss the responsibility to invest. In my third piece I will break down usury and why (most) modern investing would not fall into this category. I want to first acknowledge what … Continue reading “A Response to Jacob Imam”

Life Isn’t Fair, and That Is a Good Thing!

Throughout history, when injustice strikes, the oft-made complaint by many people, in our nation as well as any other, is the powerful outcry, “this isn’t fair.” So strong is this invocation for justice that political movements grow and flourish when injustice occurs. Yet, whether politically or personally, these crusades for justice often find themselves causing injustice that spawns a crusade against the initial victim!  At this point, I should make clear that justice in the above sense is not actually justice but the desire that everything be split evenly. In a world void of love and evil, splitting things “fairly” … Continue reading “Life Isn’t Fair, and That Is a Good Thing!”

Part I: Working at a Gas Station

If you work full-time, a lot of what you do in your life and a lot of important things that happen could be at your job. It really uses up time and you may not have a lot of time left over. This article covers things I have done and some things that happened to me while I was working at a gas station. I had to accept that my job was a big part of my life. I expect God has put a lot of similar things on all our plates. Well, I am learning to eat, like this … Continue reading “Part I: Working at a Gas Station”

Justice and Mercy

In a previous article, I did a brief analysis of the phrase “love the sinner, hate the sin” and how this phrase is often used or disregarded by Christians trying to bring their faith into practice. As I mentioned in the article, the phrase has its origins with St. Augustine, and while it draws from scripture, it does not come directly. Over the past year and a half, I have had the opportunity to dwell more on this issue that often falls along political lines for Christians. In this article, I want to address the balancing act between those Christians … Continue reading “Justice and Mercy”

Why Abortion Must Be Dismantled Culturally

Abortion is the greatest injustice of our time. Over 3,000 children are aborted every single day in the United States. Pope Saint John Paul II taught that the deliberate destruction of human life is a symptom of a deeper loss of human respect. It is jarring to hear abortion called a symptom and not the central difficulty. For the past two years, I have been working full time in the pro-life movement and after having thousands of conversations on campus, I realized that not only is Saint John Paul’s assessment correct, it is essential to understanding the pro-abortion mindset. The … Continue reading “Why Abortion Must Be Dismantled Culturally”

Romans 4

What then shall we say that Abraham, our forefather according to the flesh, discovered in this matter? If, in fact, Abraham was justified by works, he had something to boast about—but not before God. What does Scripture say? “Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness.” Now to the one who works, wages are not credited as a gift but as an obligation. However, to the one who does not work but trusts God who justifies the ungodly, their faith is credited as righteousness. David says the same thing when he speaks of the blessedness of the … Continue reading “Romans 4”