The Case for Space

There are a great many things to discuss this week, but the best thing I can talk about, somewhat like the event itself, is a brief distraction. I found the SpaceX launch to be both exhilarating and exciting. Today, then, I want to argue why humanity should pursue space travel, from a biblical perspective. An initial look at the Bible with regards to space will need clarification. Deuteronomy 4:19 warns the nation of Israel against being “lured away” by looking at the Sun and other stars. The Old Testament warns against those who place their haunches amongst the heavens, and … Continue reading “The Case for Space”

Fear of A Virus

The coronavirus has given us a very grim reflection of humanity’s worst traits. It’s shown us how quickly we are led to believe anything and everything. It’s shown how easily our leaders fall for the allure of power. It’s shown how flippantly we dismiss our neighbors as dumb or dangerous. Most importantly, from my diagnosis, it’s shown how fervently we succumb to fear. Far from keeping distance, far from avoiding cities and crowded spaces, we are afraid to leave the confines of our houses for brief weekly neighborhood walks. The hopeful, ill-intentioned or not, have been demonized more than terrorists. … Continue reading “Fear of A Virus”

The Imperative of Work

With the rebirth of the modern plague and the draconian measures taken to stop its spread, jobs have disappeared in the hundreds of thousands. Partially because of this, and partially because of a good sermon I attended a few months ago, I wanted to take a look at modern views on work. Work is often seen as a means to an end. You work, get paid, and get on with life. As a result, people throughout history have been pushing for a shorter amount of work time and more compensation for their work. We have a two-day weekend, and eight … Continue reading “The Imperative of Work”

Old Law

I had a bit of difficulty deciding what to write this week. In my own personal life, I’ve listened to two different discussions on retirement in light of Christianity. Externally, all metaphorical hell seems to be breaking loose, what with the coronavirus, the oil trade wars, the stock market plunge, and the coordinated backstabbing within the Democratic Party. I don’t believe that I have enough information to comment on those things for the moment. I’ll wait a month, then, and focus on something I’ve been considering for a while. The Hebrews of ancient times were given a set of laws. … Continue reading “Old Law”

Mass Production

It’s something I’ve felt, and undoubtedly something other people have felt. Things seem… cheaper. With regards to price, perhaps, but certainly with regards to quality. I can point out a myriad of examples, but I’d like to highlight just a few. Reasonable quality fabric used to be extremely durable and well-designed. People had one, maybe two outfits centuries ago because that was largely all they needed. It is very easy, on the other hand, to dismantle even our fanciest garments, be it toying with the threading, ripping the fabric, popping buttons, or staining it with… well, anything. Outside of clothing, … Continue reading “Mass Production”

Christianity of the Third Millennium

I can see the merits of Sola Scriptura. I can see why so many people choose to adopt that ideology. Just as Jesus seemingly condensed the law into two rules, so a summary compilation of the tenets of the faith, the Bible, condenses the work of millennia. It’s easier to read, and, in theory, it’s all a Christian needs to learn the faith. I posit, however, that adhering to Sola Scriptura alone can lead to dangerous levels of oversight. In 2020 Anno Domini, poverty is considerably less of an issue than in 20 Anno Domini. Is the means of our … Continue reading “Christianity of the Third Millennium”

The Point of Denominations

In my region of the world, it’s a taboo for a church to have a denomination. Churches that have one are said to be divisive and misleading. I disagree. Christianity is the only ideology that can span all times, cultures, and situations, but show me a single organization that could manage that much territory. No nation has been able to do it in the history of the world. Those that have come close never managed to last a century after their peak. And that’s for good reason; some cultures mix about as well as oil and water. How well did … Continue reading “The Point of Denominations”

The Role of Natives and Migrants

Migration is a fairly tricky subject, and arguably uniquely so in our day and age. There have certainly been migration patterns, even involving thousands of people, but economic migration and border-length border control have rarely been so prevalent. With both sides of the aisle slapping the Christian faith on their political perspective, or, rather, slapping their political perspective on the Christian faith, I think that a thorough analysis of immigration would be useful. It’s worth highlighting the difference between the New and Old Testaments. Christianity by design has no nationality, culture, or boundaries. Missionaries travelling across continents are the norm, … Continue reading “The Role of Natives and Migrants”

A Message to Incels

You have my sympathies. The traditional role as butt of the joke in every situation is small comfort. As a Christian on the internet, I would know a little about that. However, rather than hold a collective pity party, I would prefer to share a Christian perspective which I believe is relevant and which I hope provides some comfort. Jesus was once questioned whether divorce was acceptable, in any situation. His response was a very emphatic negative. The nature of a couple was originally intended to be inseparability. Love-based relationships surpass family bonds; they are circles of trust shared by … Continue reading “A Message to Incels”

On the Crusades and Their Significance for Christianity

Shellfish. Starving children in Africa. The Crusades. In a normal, rational world, these three subjects would be as far apart from each other topically as they are physically. In religious debate between an uninformed atheist and an unprepared Christian, however, these three topics are the conversation’s bread and butter. Having grown up in the church with an interest in theology and philosophy, I have been able to debunk these for years. To my annoyance, while the value behind these posits has been erased completely, the posits themselves subsist in some sort of perverted strength in numbers. I post this article … Continue reading “On the Crusades and Their Significance for Christianity”