The Role of a President

The modern political world often idealizes leaders who “get things done” — in other words, are able to enact an agenda effectively. I see a lot of merit in the arguments for a more powerful executive, though to be fair I have not personally acquainted myself with the arguments against the strong executive. While I am relatively unanchored concerning this debate, I nevertheless want to explore ideas in this piece that look toward scripture to highlight the proper role of a President. To start, consider one of the most pertinent passages regarding this topic when Israel receives its king in … Continue reading “The Role of a President”

Morning Walk March for Life 2022

Dear Readers, It has been three years since Morning Walk launched the Morning Walk website. We have had a lot of fun learning, sharing, and sharpening one another (Proverbs 27:17) to grow closer to God. Thank you for following our website and for giving your attention to our thoughts along the way. Over the past three years, we have published over 150 articles, organized several Morning Walk meetings throughout the country, been to the March for Life in D.C., Chicago, and San Francisco, and hosted our first conference and convention. Last year, we were not able to arrange a trip … Continue reading “Morning Walk March for Life 2022”

Small Graces for Great Glory

Something I have been learning about is the magic of ordinary days. God has a way of making small things, things we see as mundane, quite beautiful. He has been teaching me how important it is to live in holiness and happiness in every small moment of our lives. As we thank him for our meals, we see that he chose to make sweet raspberries with their bitter seeds to thrill our palates, and that he made vegetables such a dazzling array of colours from the golden of a pineapple to the deep purple of an eggplant. The stars that … Continue reading “Small Graces for Great Glory”

A Review of 2020

This article was inspired by Joseph Gnehm’s piece on Romans. These past few months I have found myself both thinking and writing on the intellectual side of theology. While I am grateful for what I have learned, given this article’s place on Christmas, I want to take a page from Gnehm’s book and just appreciate Christ. I am truly grateful for 2020. I know this is not the apt thing to say for many people. In many ways 2020 has been an extremely difficult, challenging, and unforeseen year. Between a rise in political/racial tension, a pandemic, and an economic downturn … Continue reading “A Review of 2020”

Romans 4

What then shall we say that Abraham, our forefather according to the flesh, discovered in this matter? If, in fact, Abraham was justified by works, he had something to boast about—but not before God. What does Scripture say? “Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness.” Now to the one who works, wages are not credited as a gift but as an obligation. However, to the one who does not work but trusts God who justifies the ungodly, their faith is credited as righteousness. David says the same thing when he speaks of the blessedness of the … Continue reading “Romans 4”

Augustine’s Answer to the Problem of Evil

The problem of evil, known as theodicy, has led many to doubt God’s goodness and existence. Theodicy has come up again and again throughout history, and most major theologians will deal with it at one time or another. While there are many ways thinkers have gone about answering the question, few do it as well as Augustine. Augustine lived a life afflicted by this question. He spent years not fully embracing Christ because of his doubts. While Aquinas provides a useful, and in my opinion correct, analysis of the problem, Augustine lived it. Augustine speaks of how his conscience chides … Continue reading “Augustine’s Answer to the Problem of Evil”

A Manual for Catholics on How to Dialogue with Orthodox Christians

Orthodox convo

I thought I would write a fun article that, while it contains some pearls of truth, is largely meant to tease Catholics, Orthodox, and Protestant Christians. Enjoy! Many a Catholic has gone through their entire lives without knowing what the Orthodox Christian is. For some, the word “Orthodox” often should be followed with the category of “Jew!” For other Catholics, Orthodox Christians are that weird combination of far east mysticism and Christianity, complete with bearded priests in smoke filled rooms (straight from Woodstock I suspect). For still other Catholics, Orthodox Christians were just fun people to go on Crusades with … Continue reading “A Manual for Catholics on How to Dialogue with Orthodox Christians”

Quo Vadis Thomistice?

After considerable reflection I must agree that, despite the wisdom of certain finer points of St. Bonaventure, St. Thomas truly represents the highest point of philosophy and theology and is, in this capacity, the most effective response to modern challenges. I found out that St. Thomas held positions on faith and philosophy which I thought he had totally rejected: the extrinsic influence of the faith on philosophy, the metaphysical doctrine of the divine ideas and participatory metaphysics, mystical knowledge of God, and monarchism. Aquinas is called the Common Doctor for a very good reason. He was not a wild innovator … Continue reading “Quo Vadis Thomistice?”

The Call to Evangelize

“Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” (Matthew 28:19-20) One of the primary duties of a Christian is to make disciples of others. More importantly the Church, however we may understand it, is a missionary church and charged with spreading the Gospel to the whole world. This duty is one of the most important, if not THE most … Continue reading “The Call to Evangelize”

Eye of the Needle

Watchman Nee

Imagine a drowning man. Head barely above the water, arms flailing, his efforts to reach the shore growing feebler by the minute. You watch, helpless, unable to swim yourself, and discover to your great surprise that one of your friends is standing beside you. An experienced swimmer, he watches calmly as the man begins to sink. You feel your confusion and frustration mounting. What are you doing? Don’t you see this man is drowning? Then, just as the drowning man drops his arms and ceases his yelling, you hear a splash. Strong, swift strokes—and within seconds your friend is gently … Continue reading “Eye of the Needle”